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新视野大学英语_新视野大学英语2读写教程课文unit 5 Stop Spoiling Your Chi

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新视野大学英语_新视野大学英语2读写教程课文unit 5 Stop Spoiling Your Children

新视野大学英语读写教程第二册课文unit5

Section A

Pre-reading Activities

First Listening

Please listen to a short passage carefully and prepare to anse questions.

Second Listening

Listen to the tape again. Then ansoking?

3) What does “vict

ory” mean in this story?

Weeping for My Smoking Daughter

My daughter smokes. While she is doing her homeetry problems, I am looking at the half-empty package of Camels tossed carelessly close at hand. I pick them up, take them into the kitchen, — they're filtered, for grateful. My heart feels terrible. I ents, so y daughter's death. When she smoked Marlboros and Players I hardened myself against feeling so bad; nobody I kneoked these brands.

She doesn't knoels that my father, her grandfather, smoked. But before he smoked cigarettes made by manufacturers — oked Prince Albert tobacco in cigarettes he rolled himself. I remember the bright-red tobacco tin, ore (and feen smoked) in my hometoovies in ale and female heroes smoked like chimneys, completely y father, an ily, black, outh.

I do not remember orning as he lit his first cigarette upon getting out of bed. By the time I y daughter's age, his breath barrassing to hear; he could not climb stairs to cough for an hour.

My father died from "the poor man's friend", pneumonia, one hard louch lung left at all, after coughing for so many years. He had so little breath that, during his last years, he ething. I remembered once, at a family reunion, y daughter y father picked her up for a minute — long enough for me to photograph them — but the effort ore lungs, he quit smoking. He gained a couple of pounds, but by then he that no one noticed.

When I travel to Third World countries I see many people like my father and daughter. There are large advertisement signs directed at them both: the tough, confident or fashionable older man, the beautiful, "an, both dragging aerican inner cities and on reservations, money that should be spent for food goes instead to the tobacco companies; over time, people starve themselves of both food and air, effectively selves. I read in the ney gardening magazine that the ends of cigarettes are so poisonous that if a baby s a bunch of them makes an effective insecticide.

There is a deep hurt that I feel as a mother. Some days it is a feeling of uselessness. I remember hoy daughter hoetimes ost of her life feeling half her strength, and then die of self-poisoning, as her grandfather did?

There is a quotation from a battered en's shelter that I especially like: "Peace on earth begins at home." I believe everything does. I think of a quotation for people trying to stop smoking: "Every home is a no smoking zone." Smoking is a form of self-battering that also batters those ust sit by, occasionally joke or complain, and helplessly y father kill himself: surely one such victory in my family, for the prosperous leaders panies, is enough.

新视野大学英语读写教程第二册课文unit5

Section A

Pre-reading Activities

First Listening

Please listen to a short passage carefully and prepare to anse questions.

Second Listening

Listen to the tape again. Then ansoking?

3) What does “victory” mean in this story?

Weeping for My Smoking Daughter

My daughter smokes. While she is doing her homeetry problems, I am looking at the half-empty package of Camels tossed carelessly close at hand. I pick them up, take them into the kitchen, — they're filtered, for grateful. My heart feels terrible. I ents, so y daughter's death. When she smoked Marlboros and Players I hardened myself against feeling so bad; nobody I kneoked these brands.

She doesn't knoels that my father, her grandfather, smoked. But before he smoked cigarettes made by manufacturers — oked Prince Albert tobacco in cigarettes he rolled himself. I remember the bright-red tobacco tin, ore (and feen smoked) in my hometoovies in ale and female heroes smoked like chimneys, completely y father, an ily, black, outh.

I do not remember orning as he lit his first cigarette upon getting out of bed. By the time I y daughter's age, his breath barrassing to hear; he could not climb stairs to cough for an hour.

My father died from "the poor man's friend", pneumonia, one hard louch lung left at all, after coughing for so many years. He had so little breath that, during his last years, he ething. I remembered once, at a family reunion, y daughter y father picked her up for a minute — long enough for me to photograph them — but the effort ore lungs, he quit smoking. He gained a couple of pounds, but by then he that no one noticed.

When I travel to Third World countries I see many people like my father and daughter. There are large advertisement signs directed at them both: the tough, confident or fashionable older man, the beautiful, "an, both dragging aerican inner cities and on reservations, money that should be spent for food goes instead to the tobacco companies; over time, people starve themselves of both food and air, effectively selves. I read in the ney gardening magazine that the ends of cigarettes are so poisonous that if a baby s a bunch of them makes an effective insecticide.

There is a deep hurt that I feel as a mother. Some days it is a feeling of uselessness. I remember hoy daughter hoetimes ost of her life feeling half her strength, and then die of self-poisoning, as her grandfather did?

There is a quotation from a battered en's shelter that I especially like: "Peace on earth begins at home." I believe everything does. I think of a quotation for people trying to stop smoking: "Every home is a no smoking zone." Smoking is a form of self-battering that also batters those ust sit by, occasionally joke or complain, and helplessly y father kill himself: surely one such victory in my family, for the prosperous leaders panies, is enough.

Section B

Stop Spoiling Your Children

While traveling for various speaking appointments, I frequently stay overnight in the home of a family and am assigned to one of the children's bedrooms. In it, I often find so many toys that there's almost no room — even for my small lavatory or toilet kit. And the closet is usually so tightly packed y jacket.

I'm not complaining, only making a point. I think the tendency to give children too many toys and clothes is quite common in American families. I think in far too many families not only do children come to take their parents' generosity for granted, but also the effects of this can actually be someful to children.

Why do parents give their children too much, or give them things they can't afford? I believe there are several reasons.

One fairly common reason is that parents spoil their children out of a sense of guilt. Parents e jobs may feel guilty about the amount of time they spend a their children and, as accommodation for being auch, may attempt to compensate by sho aterial possessions.

Other parents provide too much because they ade fun of if they don't obtain the same toys their friends have.

Spoiling a child also happens ands. Such parents fluctuate bets satisfactory to them. If they refuse a request, they immediately feel a ent over having been too easy. This kind of variability not only loosens the parents' ability to set limits, it also sours the parent-child relationship to some degree, robbing parents and their children of some of the happiness and mutual respect that is present in healthy families.

But spoiling children aterial things does little to reduce parental guilt (since parents never feel they've given enough), nor does it make children feel more loved (for e and attention). Instead, the effects of providing too much can be harmful. Children may, to some degree, become greedy, selfish, ungrateful and insensitive to the needs and feelings of others, beginning uch, it undermines their respect for their parents. In fact, the children begin to sense that a parent's unlimited generosity is not right. The contradiction as a result may be that these children, conversely, itations.

Also, spoiled children are not as challenged to be more creative in their play as children oney, and have less experience in learning to deal and.

The real purpose of this discussion is not to tell parents houch or hoy intention is to help those parents ight be spoiling their children but don't knoetimes you may feel uncertain about any of your children's requests. That doesn't mean you can't change. First, you should try to determine akes you submit or feel guilty. Then, even if you haven't uncovered the reason, you should begin to make firm decisions and practice responding to your children's requests in a prompt, definite manner.

Once you turn over a nepletely right aes. The key is to be satisfied provement, expecting and accepting the occasional slips that come er and more confident manner, you can't expect your children to respond immediately. For a e to respect your decisions once they learn that nagging and arguing no longer y son Larry started kindergarten(幼儿园) he gave up trousers go off the first morning y life e.

He came home the same politely(不礼貌地)to his father, spilled his baby sister's milk, and remarked that his teacher said e of the Lord in vain(滥用上帝的名义).

"Hoouth full.

"What did he do?" I asked. "Who and made him stand in a corner. He an."

The third day — it ade her bleed, and the teacher made him stay inside all during morning break. Thursday Charles had to stand in a corner during story-time because he kept pounding his feet on the floor. Friday Charles could not use the blackboard because he threal. "You knoanded at the dinner table, in a voice slightly amazed. "He told a little girl to say a outh out y husband asked.

"Nothing," Larry said. "He orning Charles forgot about the little girl and said the bad self three or four times, getting his mouth e. He also threeeting, and I uch to meet Charles's mother.

My husband came to the door e that evening as I set out for the P.T.A. meeting. "Invite her over for a cup of tea after the meeting," he said. "I y husband said. "I don't see hoeeting other."

At the meeting I sat restlessly, scanning each comfortable mother's face, trying to determine looked stressed enough to me. No one stood up in the meeting and apologized for the entioned Charles.

After the meeting I identified and sought out Larry's kindergarten teacher. She had a plate oved toiled.

"I've been so anxious to meet you," I said. "I'm Larry's mother."

"We're all so interested in Larry," she said.

"Well, he certainly likes kindergarten," I said. "He talks about it all the time."

"We had a little trouble adjusting, the first istakes, of course."

"Larry usually adjusts very quickly," I said. "I suppose this time it's Charles's influence."

"Charles?"

"Yes," I said, laughing, "you must have your hands full in that kindergarten with Charles."

"Charles?" she said. "We don't have any Charles in the kindergarten."

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